Watching

Rear Window

The main protagonist in Alfred Hitchcock’s “Rear Window” is trapped in a wheelchair, and we’re trapped too – trapped inside his point of view, inside his lack of freedom and his limited options.  When he passes his long days and nights by shamelessly maintaining a secret watch on his neighbors, we share his obsession.  It’s wrong, we know, to spy on others, but after all, aren’t we always voyeurs when we go to the movies?   Here is a film about a man who does on the screen what we do in the audience – look through a lens at the private lives of strangers.

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Loneliness

Marie Antoinette

An adroit commentary on desire and the loneliness of being female in a world that knows how to use you but not how to value and understand you, Sofia Coppola’s insightful film reveals little about the politics of the period.  This is because we are entirely within Marie’s world.  And this world is fully contained within Versailles, which shuts out all external reality.  It is a self-governing architectural island, much like Charles Foster Kane’s  Xanadu – where politics, reality and poverty have no place.
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